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  • +49 (0)7195 9071179
  • Free shipping within Germany
  • Shipping within 24 hours
  • Excellent service and quality

Traditional stone lanterns with atmospheric light

Pagoda big

Like numerous other cultural objects, the first stone lanterns arrived in Japan from China in the seventh century with the establishment of Buddhism. In the beginning, they were mainly used to illuminate Buddhist temples.

Yukimi

They also cut a fine figure in western gardens and serve as a very special eye-catcher. These traditional stone lanterns with their atmospheric light give your garden a very special magic.

Yukimi

They exude a timelessly beautiful elegance but also a massive robustness, they set important accents in any garden. Numerous Japanese stone lanterns are made of granite, lava or sandstone.

The garden decoparadise and its wide range of products

At Gartendekoparadies with its wide range of Japanese lanterns, they are made of the mineral and very stable material white concrete using the stone casting method.

Frost-proof and weatherproof

Frost-proof and weatherproof up to -30°C

This has the decisive advantage that they are frost-proof up to -30°C and also absolutely weatherproof. All lanterns are painstakingly and meticulously processed by hand and finally patinated. The versatile Garden Decoparadise offer includes stone lanterns in the style of pagodas, teahouses, tachi gatas, rankeis, yukimis, oki gatas, kotojis and special hybrids thereof. These are architectural styles modeled after authentic, life-size lantern-shaped buildings in Japan.

Tachi Gata

Some look like an ornate birdhouse, others like a tall, slender tower, and the next like a mini-story house. Most of them have a support base, which can be straight but also slanted or curved, as well as rounded or angular. Some stand on a three- or four-foot small base that looks like a stool and is called an ukebana.

The roofs of these stone lanterns are usually wavy, curved, with tapered ends or ornaments. The color schemes range from pure white to pearl and light gray, to stone gray colors and bronze tones. Due to the applied patina, some of them intentionally look a bit like they are already weathered even when new.

Oki Gata Yukimi

The pagoda lanterns are tall and narrow, consisting of various superimposed house-like stories. All types of lanterns have an onion-shaped roof peak or a small turret on the roof, which is called hoshu or hoju in technical jargon. Likewise, all types of lanterns have many windows so that the light can shine out brightly onto the surrounding pathways.

The structure of a traditional Japanese stone lantern, which is handmade, can usually be divided into eight concrete elements in its own elaborate construction.

Pagoda antique

These are called ukebana, hoju, kidan, chudai, kiso, kasa, sao and hibukuro. All of these elements have their own unique meaning and function. For the admirers of Japanese gardens or such Japanese lanterns, who are well acquainted with these myths and mysteries, they are elementary components of an extraordinary garden culture. Their timeless elegance and inimitable beauty not only provide atmospheric garden and path lighting, they also set visual accents.

That is why they are often placed at lakes, koi ponds, brooks, water features or fountains, because they are reflected in a dreamlike way in the water surfaces. In doing so, they immerse their entire surroundings in a magical light, so that everything around seems as if it has somehow sprung from another world.

What are the light sources of such Japanese lanterns.

In the beginning, these stone lanterns were intended only for use with candles or oil lamps. Over time, modern adaptations have been made here as well. Thus, such lanterns can now contain prefabricated holes that allow you to insert an LED lamp or light bulb in their light boxes. Thus, some of the garden dekoparadies lanterns can now also be operated with electric light.

The history of the Japan stone lantern

Like numerous other cultural items, the first stone lanterns arrived in Japan from China in the seventh century with the establishment of Buddhism. In the beginning, they were mainly used to illuminate Buddhist temples.

From the so-called Heian period, which began around 794, such stone lanterns were increasingly used in and around shrines. Far from such religious sites, they gained great popularity through the tea ceremonies of the 16th century. At that time, renowned tea masters began to set them up in their extensive tea gardens for decorative and lighting purposes.

Stone Lanterns

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Giant Rankei

Giant Rankei

379.00 €

Low stock
Giant Tachi-Gata

Giant Tachi-Gata

249.00 €

Low stock
Giant Pagode

Giant Pagode

259.00 €

Low stock
Pagoda big

Pagoda big

179.00 €

In stock
Tachi-Gata large

Tachi-Gata large

179.00 €

Low stock
Large Rankei

Large Rankei

209.00 €

In stock
Oki Gata Yukimi

Oki Gata Yukimi

159.00 €

In stock
Oki Gata

Oki Gata

111.75 €

149.00 €

In stock
Rankei large

Rankei large

169.00 €

In stock
Yukimi

Yukimi

159.00 €

In stock
Tachi-Gata

Tachi-Gata

139.00 €

In stock